Together again at last! David Duchovny stars on Aquarius; Gillian Anderson stars on Hannibal – it all starts Thursday, May 28 at 9/8c on NBC.




Mashable has an exclusive look at the new poster for Hannibal: Season Three. You can view it by clicking on this link to go to their article over at mashable.com.




The below is only an excerpt, please click here to go to the article to read it in full.

Two harrowing first-hand accounts of the disastrous Gallipoli landings – said by historians to be the most detailed ever seen – can be revealed for the first time today.

The diaries of Petty Officer David Fyffe and Captain John Dancy give a chilling glimpse of the First World War campaign, which will have its 100-year anniversary marked tomorrow.

Mr Dancy talks of the waters being ‘pink and frothy with fallen men’, while Mr Fyffe describes a ‘floating shambles’ on one of the first ships in the failed invasion, the SS River Clyde.

The former collier ship was supposed to sail straight onto the shore and spill thousands of men onto the Ottoman Empire’s shores, but it beached 80 yards out on arrival in April 1915.

This left troops to wade through the stormy waters, with the soldiers desperately trying to tie together boats to form a gangway to the beach as enemy fire rained down on them.

Some 86,000 Turkish, 29,500 British and Irish, 12,000 French and 11,000 Australian and New Zealand (‘Anzac’) troops died during eight months of fighting in modern-day Turkey.

The diaries have been published alongside those of Mr Dancy whose great-grandson is actor Hugh Dancy, star of TV series Hannibal and husband of Homeland actress Claire Danes.

He was a surgeon who describes his attempts to treat men ‘impaled upon this double-gauge barbed wire’ and leave others who were ‘sunk too deeply in the thick prickly scrub’.

He also writes about the terrifying approach to the Turkish beaches where men jumped overboard and ‘did not reappear again’ under the enemy fire.

Mr Dancy, who was also 24 and attached to the Australian Army Medical Corps, describes his own death-defying run for the Turkish coast.

He wrote: ‘Several fell as they ran; and on the beach I saw even more men lying untidily, some quite still and others making an occasional movement.

‘Then I jumped over into two feet of water and waded heavily ashore. The lapping edge was already pink and frothy with fallen men.

‘Shrapnel was flying in all directions save mine. It was a blind gamble with it because in the dense smoke and dust up-beach, few men could easily sight a chosen target.’

During the landings he was tasked with setting up a first aid post on the beach but soon realised he would be a sitting duck.

He left the bloody shoreline and returned to the support vessel HMS Queen Elizabeth, which was converted into a makeshift hospital.

He wrote: ‘Even as I arrived a doctor was rummaging about inside an abdomen for a large piece of shrapnel, which, to his evident amazement, he suddenly found in his hand.

‘I washed up quickly and rushed to the rescue by putting in a row of stitches in double-quick time while the victim came round sufficiently to take an almost intelligent interest in the proceedings.

‘I was kept hard at it for hours, committing miracles of surgery which, for all I knew, might have had me struck off the Rolls anywhere else.’

His diaries came to light after Mr Van Emden spoke to Mr Dancy’s son John, 94, who lived next door to his sister.

Mr Dancy said it had spent most of the past century locked in an old leather trunk in his attic after his father returned from the war and lived out his life in Cornwall.

Read more: here.




Made For Foxtel
World Premiere
Saturday, April 25th at 7:30pm (1×60’)

Presented and narrated by Sam Worthington, Deadline Gallipoli -The Full Story is an exhilarating documentary, which follows the making of the landmark drama mini-series about four journalists who fought the upper echelons of the military to get the truth out about the audacious but ill-fated Gallipoli campaign of 1915.

This is the untold story of the journalists who battled against a brutal censorship regime imposed during WW1 – the story at the heart of the politically charged, high-octane drama – is a story of our times. The gulf between the Gallipoli campaign and the theatre of modern war may span a century, but the struggle to find the truth in war reportage, often skewed by propaganda, mythmaking and censorship, remains as challenging today as it was in 1915.

The documentary explores the drama producers’ decision to tell a well-known story from a new angle. Theirs is the point of view of the four journalists: Charles Bean, Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, Phillip Schuler and Keith Murdoch who find themselves unable to report the truth they bear witness to. Though they understand that truth may sometimes be a casualty of war, the futility and carnage starts to weigh heavily on them. Two of them mount an offensive of their own with extraordinary results. These are the first truly embedded war correspondents whose actions and defiance ignite a change in the campaign’s course and whose commitment to the stories of fighting men turn Gallipoli from a strategic failure into legend. / source




I have added screen captures of Hugh in part two of the two part mini series, Deadline Gallipoli. You can view the album in our photo archive by clicking on the thumbnails below. Remember to use the #DeadlineGallipoli hashtag on twitter when tweeting about the series and let the official @Foxtel, @ShowcaseAus and @MatchboxPics social outlets know how much you enjoyed the series!





I have added screen captures of Hugh in part one of the two part mini series, Deadline Gallipoli. You can view the album in our photo archive by clicking on the thumbnails below. Remember to tune in Monday at 8.30pm on Showcase to view the second part!


Another article about the mini series popped up on the web, you can view it by clicking the link below:






You will need to click on the button ‘Watch on Vimeo’ to view the promo.




I have added captures of Hugh in two featurettes for Martha Marcy May Marlene to our photo archive.




You can read the entire interview by clicking on the ‘read more’ text below.

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