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‘Hannibal’ Revival in Talks

Fannibals, rejoice! Bryan Fuller says his fellow Hannibal executive producer Martha De Laurentiis has “started conversations” about reviving the much-loved show, which has been off the air since NBC screened the season 3 finale in August 2015. But Fuller also warned that it could still be a while before fans see the show return.

“Conversations couldn’t start until 2 years after the final airing of season 3,” Fuller wrote on Twitter earlier this week, in response to a request for news about Hannibal. “@neoprod has started those conversations. This takes time.”

–Read More @ EW

August 12th, 2017
ashley

On the Set of Hulu’s ‘The Path’: “We Get to Bring the Drama and the Weird”


We do not get to see Hugh in the video, but there is a scene of his from season one included.

So says Michelle Monaghan as she, Aaron Paul, showrunner Jessica Goldberg and others keep it light on the set of the show about a cult-like religious group even as they shoot intense scenes about passionate affairs, messy rivalries and bursts of violence.

The Path are shooting a scene in which Eddie (Aaron Paul) quite literally is threading a needle, or trying to — he’s blindfolded. “Stay close to the light,” intones his elegant spiritual mentor, Felicia (Adriane Lenox). “The light provides everything you need.” Paul misses once, twice, then guides the thread through. Awestruck, he lifts the blindfold and raises his eyes to Lenox. “OK, cut,” says veteran director Phil Abraham. Paul pumps his fist. “That’s how you do it,” he says. “Badaboom badabing.”

The first season of The Path introduced viewers to the Meyerists, a cult-like religious group struggling to move forward after its founder falls ill. The second season ratchets up the pressure on both leaders and followers. But the set of the intense show — which features passionate affairs, messy rivalries and bursts of violence — is calm and efficient. “We keep it light and focused,” says Paul. “A lot of that starts with Jessica [Goldberg, the show’s creator and showrunner].”

On the monitor, Sarah (Michelle Monaghan) now is in the same hotel room having a confrontation with Felicia. It’s a grim moment, but Monaghan laughs after finishing the scene. “It’s a great environment,” she says. “We get to bring the drama and the weird.”

There’s a palpable respect among the cast and crew of Path, and that extends to the writing and to Goldberg — who looks remarkably alert, considering that she just got off a red-eye flight from Los Angeles. She waves away any compliments. “Look, one of the blessings is having met [executive producer] Jason Katims. He knows how to create a good place to work, and he’s not a time-waster. It’s good to be mentored by someone like that.”

A key strength of the series is that it presents the Meyerists as having a range of faith and belief. Goldberg has set up a kind of religious love triangle: Eddie is the doubter, Cal [Hugh Dancy] the pragmatist, and Sarah the true believer. Tensions among them become more pronounced in the second season. “The first season was about people, and with the religion, maybe the skeptics were right, maybe there’s nothing,” says Goldberg. “This season we’re exploring if maybe there’s something.”

It’s time for lunch, for the crew at least. Paul heads to his dressing room to run lines, and Monaghan is giving a set tour. Goldberg ducks into a production meeting. “I heard that script is turning out great,” she says. “How’s it going with this episode. Amazing?”

This story first appeared in a November standalone issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe. Read article on HollywoodReporter.com

November 24th, 2016
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24 Hour Plays on Broadway

The annual event will be held at the American Airlines Theatre.

Participants have been announced for The 24 Hour Plays on Broadway—the annual event that brings together professionals from the entertainment industry to write, direct and perform six original plays within a day’s time—which will be presented November 14 at 8 PM at the American Airlines Theatre.

Proceeds benefit the Company’s program supporting theatre professionals 25 and under—The 24 Hour Plays: Nationals.

Actors planning to participate in this year’s event include Justin Bartha (The Hangover); Jason Biggs (Orange is the New Black); Michael Cerveris (Fun Home); Michael Chernus (OITNB); Joanna Christie (Narcos); Hugh Dancy (Hannibal); Rachel Dratch (Saturday Night Live); Grace Gummer (Mr. Robot); Mamie Gummer (The End of the Tour); Gaby Hoffmann (Transparent); David Krumholtz (Numbers); Andre Royo (The Wire); Thomas Sadoski (The Newsroom); Justice Smith (The Get Down); Amber Tamblyn (Joan of Arcadia); and Alicia Witt (The Walking Dead).

The Company has also announced five writers who will participate in the creation of the original plays: Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright David Lindsay-Abaire; playwright Hansol Jung; playwright and television producer Warren Leight; playwright Jonathan Marc Sherman; and Drama Desk Award-winning playwright Bess Wohl. Additional cast members, writers and directors will be announced over the coming weeks.

New York-based singer, songwriter and playwright Ethan Lipton and his Orchestra will be the musical guests for the evening.

“This year, we are proud to be once again working with a diversity of great talent spanning the entertainment industry—from upcoming actors leading hit television series, to those breaking ground in theater and film,” said Mark Armstrong, executive director of The 24 Hour Plays, said in a statement. “The 24 Hour Plays on Broadway has always provided an opportunity for many actors to try their hand at theater for the first time, while others return to the art form we all fell in love with. We look forward to seeing the six original productions this group will create.”

It was previously announced that Tony-nominated director Leigh Silverman will be the honoree for the evening. At the event, playwright Lisa Kron and actor Jayne Houdyshell will speak about Silverman’s influential work.

Following the November 14 gala, productions of The 24 Hour Plays are planned to take place in Denmark, Germany, Mexico and Dublin as well as in various theatres across the United States.

Click here for ticket information. / Source

October 5th, 2016
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@TheArticleMag – Hugh Dancy Deluxe Edition

You can read my review about the original article magazine here. This review is for the Deluxe Hugh Dancy Edition.

Article Magazine Deluxe Edition arrived in the mail today is safe packaging, which kept it in perfect condition during shipping. And once opened, Hugh’s gorgeous face came into view. Like I had said about the previous edition, everything about ARTICLE is wonderful. Everything feels like I had said in the previous review both professional and authentic. The quality of this item is really high. It is something that when you set it out you just want to keep picking it back up and re-reading, re-browsing. It’s something that makes a statement and this deluxe edition does that as well.

It comes encased in a brand new sleeve, which has images from the photoshoot never before seen in the previous edition. It’s such a gorgeous sleeve that I guarantee you will never want to remove it. The other feature is a brand new 8-page poster booklet, with exclusive unreleased images. And when they say exclusive, they mean it. In this booklet I find my favorite shot of the entire set. It includes Hugh in black and white. I won’t go into detail about this gorgeous shot as I believe it needs to be seen to experience how truly amazing it is, along with the other stunning never before seen photos in the booklet.

The next feature is an A2-size full colour, double-sided fold-out poster of Hugh. Let me tell you what a treat it is to have this poster. It’s something that would go perfect either framed or not, but it is something as a fan I would want to showcase to friends who come to visit. It’s gorgeous. Beautiful. One side has the cover photo for article and the other has the close up image (which I adore).

On a rating scale from 1-100, this would surpass the 100 marker with flying colors. I absolutely adore this and am very satisfied with it as a fan. Anything ARTICLE releases is worth it. Trust me!

You can purchase from them at their store here (deluxe edition) or the original edition here.

August 2nd, 2016
admin

Hugh Dancy for WMagazine

Hugh Dancy
The Path (Hulu)
Cal, your character, is the charismatic leader of a religious movement, called Meyerism, which has been described as cultlike. Do you see it that way?
Honestly, at this point I no longer distinguish. I think it’s really true that my cult is your religion.

What was the first part you ever landed?
I was 13 and at this very British school, the kind of school where someone could just come up to you and say, “We’re doing The Tempest next year, and you’re going to be Ariel.” And you would have to say, “Ah, okay…” I didn’t realize at the time I was taking any sort of plunge. Professionally, my first role was in a TV miniseries called Trial and Retribution. I played the acolyte to a serial killer—and I then spent several years after that doing costume dramas, which some would say was more what I was destined for. I’ve had to claw my way back to playing a serial killer’s acolyte.

Dancy wears a Dior Homme shirt.

Grooming by Lauren Kaye Cohen at Tracey Mattingly.
Photography by Mona Kuhn
Styled by Patrick Mackie
Source

June 29th, 2016
admin

[2016] Emmy Magazine #6

I have added scans from Emmy Magazine‘s no. 6 issue to our photo archive. You can click on the thumbnails to go to the album.

June 26th, 2016
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Hugh Dancy Reveals What Made Him Want to ‘Commit’ to ‘The Path’ on Hulu

Following three seasons of playing criminal profiler Will Graham on Hannibal, Hugh Dancy delighted fans when he returned to the screen so quickly after the cult NBC series was canceled, starring on The Path on Hulu.

The new series, created by Jessica Goldberg (writer and producer of Parenthood) and executive producers Jason Katims and Michelle Lee of True Jack Productions, saw the English actor trade serial killers for religious fanatics as Cal Roberts, an ambitious leader within a fringe religious movement.

While struggling to maintain some control of the Meyerist Movement, Cal had to battle his many internal demons, which didn’t always stay as deep or tucked away as he liked. Following the finale, the 41-year-old actor talked to ET his understanding of Cal, the joys of sermonizing onscreen, and being a star on Hulu:

Entertainment Tonight: First off, congratulations on the show. I was just curious, what was your take on The Path when you first joined? Did you realize what exactly it was going to do?

Hugh Dancy: I often realize how seriously Jessica Goldberg and the other writers were taking the question of faith, and the individual faith of the different characters, and that to me, is what made me want to commit to it. I suppose what I didn’t know that it was some form of a power struggle or a quest for power. I don’t think I knew — and I’m not even sure the writers knew — the degree to which they’d allow kind of hints of spirituality or mysticism, like genuine mysticism, to bleed into the show. I think that adds a whole different note to it.

One thing I liked, especially in terms of your character, this slow descent into a sinister character who’s really struggling for control of power. And I was curious, how did you balance how dark to go with each episode, and how much to let viewers see?

Certainly, the blueprint’s in the script overall, but I had to decide for myself how heavily to lean on the fault lines that are running through him, in terms of his background, his upbringing, and then there’s the extreme pressure that’s been brought to bear on him, just because of his isolation at the top of the movement, essentially, nobody else knowing what he knows. Both those things I was quite sympathetic towards, I felt like he was struggling to stay afloat on top of a really raging sea, not of his making, certainly. Then as he tried to navigate all of that, there was a secondary factor, which is that his own ambition, his own alpha-driven desire to control. That, I suppose, I have less sympathy for. Ultimately, just the goal there is to have you understand to some extent what’s driving him, and be a bit horrified by it, but not completely lose everybody’s sympathy.

Tell me about a favorite moment from filming this season.

I think I enjoyed — I mean, broadly speaking — the span of the character, in the sense that he can focus very, very intently on an individual and laser in on them. But he also has the capacity to stand in front of a big, big crowd and preach. It’s rare that you get the opportunity to flex all those muscles. He is a performer and he is theatrical. So, I got to indulge that. I suppose those sermonizing scenes and, particularly in the first episode, when I’m recounting the story of Plato’s cave. They were daunting but enjoyable.

I also love that Cal is listening to these self-help tapes about the idea of smiling and presenting and how you win people over. Did you think much at all about things like the facial expressions or your body movements, and what he would do in terms of getting control of people?

To a degree, I mean without sitting down and being exact about it, it factors into the way he carries himself, the way he speaks. If you have the kind of confidence that he does, it’s going to affect the way you sound. What I found interesting about him was that he, to some extent, he’s in a leadership role for a long time, but he’s been thrown into an entirely new and unexpected spotlight. All of which is basically unwanted on his part. He’s rapidly struggling to catch up. He’s got charisma but he’s also kind of doing Charisma 101.

Considering that you’re now on Hulu versus a traditional network, like NBC, are the expectations for the show different? What’s the experience like being on this kind of network?

Well, you know, it’s interesting because in terms of Hannibal, NBC was very — at least, from where I was sitting — very hands-off in a good way. Very quickly they gave the controls to [creator] Bryan Fuller. Maybe it would be the more typical network experience, where there are a lot of people looking over your shoulder. That said, I don’t know that anybody on the network would have commissioned The Path and then just put it out there in the world and had faith that it would slowly gain an audience. You just can’t do that.

What did you learn about yourself, filming the show?

What I learned was that regardless of how you define yourself in terms of your religion, or your beliefs, everybody has some desire for meaning and for belonging. So any one of us — including myself, I suppose — are potentially open, or I would say vulnerable, to this kind of experience that the characters on the show are having.

Source

June 22nd, 2016
admin

Aaron Paul mentions Hugh in interview with Variety

Paul: Does he have his lines memorized?

Hiddleston: Hugh Laurie is the most diligent, most serious, most professional actor you could possibly work with. Woe betide the actor who is not ready to work with Hugh. He’s a true pro. Hugh has his lines memorized, sometimes lines that he’s written himself.

Paul: That’s like Hugh (Dancy) on “The Path.” I’ve never seen him with the set of sides. Which, for me, I mean I come prepared, but it’s nice to have that as a security blanket.

Hiddleston: Sure.

Paul: But I look at Hugh… I really look up to him. I mean, he’s such a phenomenal actor, but he’s never once looked at a page of sides.

Hiddleston: It’s interesting. I always find there are some actors who come with the script completely internalized and never have to look at it, and they come very ready with ideas to pitch about staging. And other actors who are more fluid. And there’s no one way that’s better. I think some people like to feel their way through it and be spontaneous, and other people like to have thought about it before.

Paul: Right. This is a big difference that I see with TV and film. Film, the script tends to, at least in my experience, tends to somewhat stay the same, in terms of the dialogue and the story. And with TV, I’m getting pages the night before, with the scenes being completely changed. I like having my little security blanket.

June 10th, 2016
admin

Hugh Dancy goes big as a cult leader in ‘The Path’

When last we tuned into the TV career of U.K.-born Hugh Dancy, he was playing FBI profiler Will Graham, who developed a strange personality meld with his subject, Hannibal Lecter, in “Hannibal.” In the finale, the two of them tumbled off a cliff in a death embrace. These days, Dancy is again looking into the abyss as Cal Roberts, the would-be-leader of a spiritual/religious cult known as Meyerism in Hulu’s “The Path” – a man who will do whatever it takes to ensure that his faith goes unquestioned. Dancy (who is married to “Homeland’s” Claire Danes) sat down with The Envelope at Doma Na Rohu in New York City, and they dove right in.

I couldn’t help watching Cal in “The Path” without thinking that, in some way, Will survived his fall and resurfaced as this Machiavellian leader of a spiritual cult – with all of Hannibal’s lessons intact. How far off is that?

Perhaps, but Will survived some version of that cliff fall at the end of every season. That first season he’s incarcerated, the second he’s gutted and – we don’t know what happened at the end of the third season. I always wondered when he would come out gleaming and whole and deadly, but the bubble of his empathy always rose to the surface. Not that Cal isn’t conflicted, but everything about them and the style of the series are so different.

How so?

We were trying to ground “Hannibal” psychologically and give it depth but we weren’t trying to pretend that this was actually happening in Baltimore. [“The Path”] lives or dies by the belief that it could be real. It’s preposterous, very heightened in many ways, but we’re looking for naturalism at all times. Both Will and Cal are in deep conflict over who they really are, though, and that’s true of any character worth being dramatized.

In “The Path,” Meyerism doesn’t initially seem bad or scary on the surface, as far as cults go. There’s a real self-help feel.

I realized when I was getting ready for [the show] that if you’re going to start a religion you have to go big. If I was going to do it tomorrow, I wouldn’t start with “Everyone’s going to be nice to each other and you’ll probably be OK in the end.” It’s got to be something so extreme and hard to believe that people have to go on faith. If you tell everyone that in fact everything they can see is made of cheese, a certain number will say, “Cheese, I can go with that.”

I would sign up for that faith, but it’s terrible for the lactose-intolerant.

Heretics! Anyway, I think that’s what the show does very well: Balancing up the belief system. It’s recognizable, it’s sympathetic and based around the desire for community and simplicity and transparency. Those are all things we can get behind.

Are you particularly curious about religion or theology?

Belief interests me. The idea of conviction is something that’s pretty intrinsic to acting. When I think about the character as a whole, I tend to think about the beliefs that we have or we think we have or that we’re trying out, the things we offer up in discussion or argument, how in a way we’re debating ourselves. Then the beliefs that are so deeply grounded in us we take them as a given – that all seems tied into the idea of religious belief.

You’ve had a run of pretty intense roles. Think you’ll be up for a wacky screwball comedy sometime soon?

I’ve done my fair share of comedies. But you ride the waves of things that are coming to you as long as they’re interesting. It’s not like, “At last I’m being taken seriously!” – I don’t have that feeling. It’s just, “Oh, you think I can do that? I’ll try that.” I’ve got the usual roster of anxieties and insecurities, but it’s not like I have to be desperately taken seriously.

So what are you most insecure about?

It’s like a fear that I have not done enough, not thought hard enough about something to do justice to it, and when the thing is complete it will be apparent. I used to feel more that way – that’s a quintessential actor’s feeling – but I still feel the challenge of wanting to do justice to richly thought-out material. Source

June 9th, 2016
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TheWrap – StudioWrap Portraits + Interview

I have added five portraits of Hugh from a photo session with TheWrap. You can view the original article here. And the photos by clicking on the thumbnails to go to the album.

You can view a video from TheWrap as well as the interview below:

Hugh Dancy‘s character on Hulu’s “The Path” is so magnetic that even the actor who portrays him couldn’t resist falling under his spell.

On the Hulu original drama, Dancy plays Cal Roberts, the charismatic cult leader of the Meyerist movement. Fans of the series saw him as a villain, but that was a reception Dancy hadn’t predicted while shaping the character and filming the series.

“It turns out I was playing a much darker character than I realized,” the actor told TheWrap. “I was busy justifying him and kind of feeling, basically, sympathy for him. And it turns out I’m pretty much alone in that feeling.”

The series, from creator Jessica Goldberg and executive producer Jason Katims, also stars “Breaking Bad’s” Aaron Paul and “True Detective” alum Michelle Monaghan as a couple who begin to question their faith and loyalty to Dancy’s reckless leader.

“We all kind of share the load, and we all get to work with each other,” Dancy said of his co-stars. “There’s a lot of dynamics across the show.”

To capture the atmosphere of a real cult, “The Path” films on a real religious compound just outside of New York. The scenic location goes a long way in setting the tone of the show, Dancy explained.

“It’s kind of idyllic,” he said. “It creates the environment of the show to a great degree, just by virtue of being by the Hudson River.”

June 7th, 2016
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